Finally, Part 3 of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0” series is here. During the last few weeks I have researched possible scenarios and real case studies of Web 2.0 in education in hopes to show others where we are with today’s education and where it could be. The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more. Also, if you are new to the series, don’t forget about Part 1 and Part 2!

Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1
Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2

Educational Blogging

Blogging has quickly become one of the most effective learning tools in education today. It introduces students with new methods of communicating, improving their writing, and helps motivate them to find their voice. Dare I say it even makes learning… fun? Educators generally blog about school news, philosophies, and class activities. On the other hand, students tend to write about current events, personal beliefs, and topics related to their education.

In blogging, there are no set standards, no boundaries, no restrictions confining you to conform your thoughts to any given set of rules and regulations. You don’t have to worry about getting points taken off for not using the default: 12 point font size, Times New Roman, with 1” margins. You can write freely, and at your own pace. Also, bloggers can gain an audience from their writing. Unlike a school paper, blog posts can recieve feedback from students, teachers, parents, and ultimately, anyone in the world. (gasp)

Things I’ve noticed with student blogs

I often found, and many teachers have noted this as well, that the students would publish to their school blogs even when not instructed to. Students really enjoy reaching out to the world and they are so motivated by it that they want to write even more. They would describe how their day was, what they learned in class, or even things they learned or read on the news that day. It’s amazing.

I also found that many students became so attached to their blogs that they made it a responsibility to keep consistent. When they found they have been lacking in posts or that they haven’t been instructed to post for class in in a while, they would often apologize and feel as though they deserted their readers. It’s pretty interesting, although expected, to see that kind of connection with students and their blogs.

Also, I see that many students refer to other posts by other students in their writing, but do not appear to take advantage of trackback or pingback functionality. I personally feel it is essential that all bloggers understand the use of trackback technology, especially in this scenario, as it makes for communication outside of normal commenting. Not only that, it feels very rewarding receiving a trackback. So, I want to explain briefly how it works and what it means. In simplistic terms, you make a pingback by linking to the post that you are referring to in your post. This will notify the writer of the blog, adding a pingback “comment” to their post automatically, in turn continuing conversation. This is a great way for students to communicate back and forth rather than only commenting. If they have something to say and feel it’s worth a post rather then a comment, pingback or trackback it.

Student Testimonials and Reflections

“Blogs are revolutionizing this country, and many people are completely oblivious to even what a blog is much less what it can. So thank you Mrs. Vicki for convincing me what a viable resource a blog can be. Thank you for not letting me be ignorant to something so revolutionary.” – kyli

“At the beginning of the year when we started blogs, I didn’t really feel like doing these, and I thought that they were just a waste of time, but I was WRONG! I have loved having these blogs and I learned a lot about writing, people, things happening with my friends, I met new people, I have learned ALOT about things going on in the world, and I learned that I can be free to write what I want, and I like how people would disagree with me, becasue it just encouraged me to write more.” – Xoxo-Hillaryy-xoxo

“I love my blog so much! I like writing in it, even if there isn’t anything to write about! Haha. When i get bored, my blog says ‘Ashley, come write in me.’ I’m just joking, but it gives me something to do. I am so happy that we are doing blogs this year!” – Ashley

“I love my blog so much I can write what I want when I want except when my mom or sister is on the computer. My favorite part about having a blog is that it can be due on a Sunday and you cannot forget it at home or at school. I also like how you can write on it even if it is not for homework. The thing I worry about with blogs is that its world wide and if I say something to offend them then they will get mad at me and I wont no why. Other wise I think blogs are a great idea.” – Joey Girl

“When I wasn’t in the weblog group I would still be writing one paragraph essay. Now I’m writing a page essay.” … “Weblogs are helping me a lot.” – Jhonathan

General Testimonials

“Never in 25 years of teaching have I seen a more powerful motivator for writing than blogs.” … “And that’s because of the audience. Writing is not just taped on the refrigerator and then put in the recycle bin. It’s out there for the world to see. Kids realize other people are reading what they write” – Mark Ahlness

“Even when they’re out sick, students work on their blogs.” – Carol Barsotti

“I’ve got 6th graders coming in during their lunch and after school to add articles to their blog and to respond to their classmates’ articles.” – Al Gonzalez

“The response has been tremendous. Students seem so much more willing to blog in their own space and time. They seem less inhibited and more enthusiastic.” – Beth Lynne Ritter-Guth

Where to Start

So, where do you start? As a first stop, I highly recommend reading SupportBlogging. It will explain what educational blogging is all about, what it means for students and educators, and how you can setup a blog. I also recommend Blogs for Learning which is a new site containing in-depth articles on educational blogging and fantastic screencast tutorials showing the ins and outs of various blogging platforms (including WordPress and Blogger). Be sure to look over the article, “Student Blogging – What You Should Know,” and the case study, “Rocking the Cyber Canoe: Blogging in English.”

For teachers and students, I suggest using edublogs.org for blogging as they provide you with a free, hosted WordPress blog, a Wiki powered by Wikispaces, and Yacapaca assessment tool from the Chalkface Project. Or if you prefer, you can install a copy of WordPress manually on your own server or register for a free and hosted WordPress account at WordPress.com.

Photo Sharing with Flickr

Flickr is a free photo sharing site which has made its way into education providing teachers and students with an easy way to upload and share photos on the web. Students can search for photos to help with research and projects and educators can upload photos for classes, school events, and so on. I can also see Flickr being used in photography classes allowing students to keep an organized collection of their work, share their photos with the world, and receive commentary from viewers and classmates. And who knows? Maybe all it takes is a comment or a couple views of a students work to inspire and motivate them in continuing with photography.

One feature to take advantage of is Flickr’s photo annotation, or note functionality. In short, it allows you to add boxes around specific parts of a photo which you can add notes to. For example, if something was hard to make out in the background of a photo, one could place a note around it to explain what it is. What’s more is that other users can annotate your own photos. Say you are a teacher and you uploaded an art piece that you want your students to critique. Have them browse to the art piece and add notes around parts they want to comment on. Some great examples of this are as followed:

Beth Harris of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, has used Flickr with her art history course so students can label and discuss paintings online (example above). Similarly, Ewan McIntosh has uploaded the painting, “Ivory, Apes and Peacocks,” where users then labeled and discussed the art.

Alan Levine has also shown that you can use the notes tool to create what he calls, “hot-spot learning objects.” As an example, he created a volcano diagram with each type being a learning object on the photo. The example is a simple chart showing the explosiveness of an volcano. If you are to hover over one of the volcano’s, a Flickr note will appear containing more information about it. Alan has also annotated a photo showing some of the many uses of Flickr. Nice work!

Educational Podcasting

Podcasting is a powerful medium that many educators and students are beginning to pick up that not only delivers rich educational content, but enhances student/teacher communication. As I student, I could download educational content and take it around with me where ever I go. I could also download daily lessons and school news created by educators. Likewise, I can produce my own podcast and publish it for the teacher, classmates, and the world to hear.

Take Stanford University for example where they have created Stanford on iTunes U for their students. Students can navigate to this site to subscribe to the Stanford U podcast on iTunes and receive faculty lectures, interviews, music and sports automatically on their computer and iPod. This allows the university to easily communicate and update students on school related events and content. What’s also great is that anyone can open the page up on iTunes and listen, whether they are a student or not. Try it out and listen to some of the podcasts. There’s great content, especially in the “Technology Ventures” area of “Heard on Campus”, including speeches by Guy Kawasaki on entrepreneurship, Evan Williams of Odeo on podcasting, and more. (Note: Berkeley University also has Berkeley on iTunes U).

Apple also supports educational podcasting in multiple ways. For starters, anyone can access the Podcasts section in the iTunes Store and navigate to the educational category for free lessons and educational content. Secondly, schools interested in creating a podcast site similar to Staford University can apply for iTunes U where iTunes will work with you in making your own iTunes U (Note: I have no information regarding costs). Apple also provides a section called, Podcasting in Education, where you can learn more about podcasting, what it means for educators and students, and how you can create and manage them with Apple products.

For educators in K-12 education, I recommend looking over a great site called, “Podcasting in the Classroom”, created by Nathan Shelley. The website gives a brief introduction of podcasting and provides an overview of benefits to the students in creating podcasts. The site also provides educators with an example lesson plan where it instructs the students to get into groups to brainstorm, plan, and produce a student podcast on a specific subject.

DreamExtreme Podcast is an excellent podcast produced by, believe it or not, 6th graders! The student-produced podcast is by David Cosand’s Kennedy Elementary class of Medford, Oregon, and I must admit, it’s pretty impressive. Students plan and produce full podcasts covering class news, movie reviews, fashion, sports, and more. Another podcast that I’ve recently come across is Edupodder, produced by Steve Sloan. Edupodder has a nice mix of educational content, interviews, and student podcasts – the latest covering upcoming student podcast projects. Some of you may also be interested in an Edupodder Podcast with Robert Scoble speaking to a journalism class about the impact of blogging.

Wikipedia & Wikis

While researching about wikis in education, I came across a Wikipedia article for educators called, “Schools’ FAQ,” covering the ins and outs of Wikipedia and how schools can benefit using Wikipedia. The article led me to Wikipedia’s School and University Projects, which I found to be very interesting. In short, Wikipedia encourages teachers and professors to use Wikipedia in their classes providing students with hands on exercises involving editing and publishing content on Wikipedia. Wikipedia suggests that students participate in exercises such as working on existing or requested articles; linking orphaned articles to appropriate places; fixing spelling, factual, grammatical, and other errors in articles; and even translating articles from other languages. It’s a great idea and is beneficial to both the student and Wikipedia. Students can learn about the topic as well as improve on their writing while Wikipedia gains more content. Wikipedia even provides teachers with a syllabus boilerplate to hand out to their students. If you are a teacher, think about giving it a try with your class, maybe as a project. I feel it would be a very perceptible and comprehendible variation of learning. I will also add that these projects may be more suitable for college and university students rather than K-12 students.

Perhaps one of the most impressive cases of wiki use in education is the Westwood School Wiki. Vicki Davis and her students manage the wiki and use it for just about everything. Listening to an interview with Vicki and Adam Frey, I was able to grasp exactly how she and her students use wiki technology. One scenario presented was after teaching a lesson, her students would go to the class wiki and summarize the lesson, in turn making it easier to take in the information. Vicki also explained how her students work on notes collaboratively in the wiki before an exam to study. During this process they all add their notes, correcting what’s wrong, and review the wiki. Another example she gave was with introducing concepts and exploring class projects. She has the students research, add notes, organize information, and even add videos to their wikis so they end up with a mass of information about the topic (example project: Security and Privacy). Vicki stated during the interview, “Students really become content producers and not just receivers.” She makes a great point and it shows that allowing students to work hands on with a wiki really strengthens their learning experience. Being part and contributing to what you are learning is much more effective then simply taking it in.

I also came across this great question from a Vicki’s blog about Pluto no longer being a planet: “How long will it take for the Pluto decision to filter to the average classroom?” She then continues, “With information changing at an accelerated pace, I think the case for wiki-supplementation and wiki-publication can be made. This could ensure that more accurate information is included but could also make student’s heads spin as a chapter changes while they are studying it.” It’s a very interesting question and thinking back to my High School education, textbooks were dated as much as 6-10 years. Some even having my parents signatures in them! How long will it take for school systems to replace old books with new ones containing accurate information? It’s funny. I’ve come across multiple claims online where teachers tell students not to use Wikipedia because information may not be accurate when anyone can edit the information, but at the same time, the school may not even own up to date prints.

Video Sharing

To many school systems, video sharing sites are evil. They are blocked from students in an attempt to hide non-educational material and explicit content. Well I say, big mistake! I will admit, I have seen many hilarious, pointless, painful, and explicit videos on video sharing sites, but I can also say that I have learned a whole lot from them. Google Video offers some of the best educational videos you can find on the Internet. You can pull up their educational category and search for specific topics ; watch hour long NOVA videos (highly recommend – I’ve watched many of these during my free time); and even view captioned videos. Additionaly, YouTube offers a new service called YouTube College where students can join their college and share videos only with students from their college. On the down side, YouTube does not offer an educational category making it harder to find educational content. I also recommend giving VideoJug a try as a source of how-to videos. It has a great kids category containing fun science experiments and arts and crafts.

Video also appears to be the new PowerPoint for some educators. Jeff Utecht has taught his 7th grade students of Shanghai American School to produce and publish video presentations on YouTube for a class project. You can find the presentations in Jeff Utecht’s profile. I watched a couple of them and I’m very impressed. It sounds like the students were pretty excited, especially once they learned about YouTube’s audience. You can find more about the project and student reactions on Jeff’s blog.

James Madison University has also taken advantage of video sharing by using YouTube to deliver an orientation video for faculty teaching in technology classrooms. They created a video that shows educators how to operate the technology used in the classrooms including laptop connectors, projector screens, and the control system used to operate the projectors. You can watch the video and read the article about it on their technology website.

Web 2.0… Courses?

I never really thought about the possibility of there being a Web 2.0 course in college, but apparently it’s happening. IBM and The University of Arizona are teaming up to teach about Web 2.0 and Social Networking to give students skills in creating and managing online communities. What’s interesting is that it’s not just a presentation or learning event – it’s an actual full course! From what I understand, students from The University of Arizona will learn about Web 2.0 products and social networking from a business standpoint to give leadership, communication, and community-building skills.

One UA student in a Digg comment thread provided readers with the official course description from the university website:

“Online social networking and communities have become a big role in how organizations interact within themselves as well as with external partners. Developing a healthy community can lead to new business opportunities, improved customer relations, as well as improved communications to the world. Online social network sites already claim over 300 million members worldwide in public sites that are starting to turn into a new generation of b2b and b2c business collaboration and brokerage sites. This course investigates the technologies, methods and practices towards developing online communities, and how this knowledge and these skills are applied to businesses. The course will involve lectures facilitated by the instructor and corporate representatives. Also incorporated will be experiential exercises and skill development assignments”

The press release also states, “The class will culminate in a final project where each student from the class will work with their own separate group of students from Howenstine High School in Tucson, Arizona, to organize into many micro-communities.”

Sounds like a fun and informative class. And according to Torrentfreak, The Univeristy of Arizona will be the first to offer “Web 2.0 courses”. It will certainly open up a new world of technology to students. Great going, IBM! Sign me up!

School 2.0

School 2.0 is an interesting brainstorming tool designed for schools and communities to help envision the future of education. The tool is a diagram showing various possible scenarios or visions of the future with example student, teacher, and parent conversations, class room activities and technologies, and more. The School 2.0 site states, “While School 2.0 depicts a variety of educational and management scenarios that utilize technology, the examples, information and ideas included are designed to serve as prompts for discussion and should not be construed as a recommendation of any particular technology or scenario.”

“Can you IM that to the virtual whiteboard?”, says a teacher. A parent talks to his child, “I looked at your grades online today. You really aced that test!” “There’s a virtual frog dissection going on now,” one student said to another holding a mobile device.

It’s an amazing vision. Can “School 2.0” actually happen? Maybe not all of it, but perhaps some elements. For example: viewing student progress reports online, submitting permission slips online, and receiving class documents and files from anywhere. I can’t imagine “School 2.0” happening in the next couple years, but the possibility is there and it’s nice to see a brainstorm tool such as the School 2.0 project.

More Cases of Web 2.0 in Education:

Google Docs, formerly Writely, has quickly jumped into the educational field actings as a free and collaborative alternative to Microsoft Word. Mostly used by K-12 Education (from what my research shows me), I assume it’s just not ready for college or university scenarios where page structure has stricter guidelines. However, feedback from students show that although they like Writely (now Google Docs), they find more use in Microsoft Word because they know how to use it better. They then continue by saying that in time, they will likely prefer Writely because it can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection and can be worked on collaboratively.

Feed Readers and RSS are slowly making its way into education teaching students the methods of subscription and publication. I found that most schools that take advantage of educational blogging briefly teach about RSS so students and teachers can more easily keep track of school updates and postings. It also appears that Bloglines is the feed reader of choice (PDF by Will Richardson) for many educators, mainly due to it being accessible anywhere. However, some educators are beginning to notice other options that are simpler and more useful for students, such as the personalized homepage, Netvibes. “I used to teach bloglines, however this summer, I began to use NetVibes. It is just easier for beginners to understand,” said Vicki Davis of Cool Cat Teacher Blog.

It may sound odd, but some students are now learning in their SecondLife. Harvard Law School has recently started a new course called, CyberOne, where students actually log into their SecondLife account and learn in the massively popular virtual world. The CyberOne course website states, “Enrollment to the Harvard Extension School is open to the public. Extension students will experience portions of the class through a virtual world, known as Second Life. Videos, discussions, lectures, and office hours will all take place on Berkman Island. Students from anywhere in the world will be able to interact with one another, in real time.” Sounds a little extreme to me! I will admit though, I am curious as to how it all works. For those of you interested, head over to the CyberOne website and watch this video trailer (YouTube) that can give you an idea of what to expect.

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70 Comments on “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3”

  1. chen bo says:

    Well said.
    Are those sites mentioned all free?

  2. Brian Benzinger says:

    Thanks, Chen. To answer your question, “Are those sites mentioned all free?” For the most part, yes. I tried to discuss each topic mentioning a few products in each, but there are many options out there. The ones I have mentioned are all free, so have at it! :)

  3. James Byers says:

    Hi Brian – thanks for such a detailed writeup. We’re thrilled to see how Vicki and other teachers are bringing wikis into their classrooms. In regards to the ‘free’ question, I thought I’d mention that we’re giving 100,000 wikis for use in K-12 classrooms with no ads or usage limitations:

    http://www.wikispaces.com/site/for/teachers100K

    Thanks!
    James
    Wikispaces.com

  4. Paul Stamatiou says:

    Hot sauce! I’ve been waiting for part 3. =) Wikis are very prominent for education purposes especially at my school, several of my classes have their own, simple wikis.

    Speaking of Web 2.0 courses… that IBM/Arizona course is definitely not the first. “Tech” universities have caught onto the Web 2.0 trend much earlier. I’m taking some Information Design and Interaction Design courses at Georgia Tech that teach the whole principle of web 2.0 as well as how to build web apps with technologies like php, mysql, xml, js, ajax and flash.

  5. The Third Bit » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 Tools for School says:

    [...] Via SolutionWatch, a list of Web 2.0 tools for students and teachers. This is the first in a three-part series; lots of good ideas here. (Part 2 and Part 3 are online.) [...]

  6. maestroalberto » Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (terza parte) says:

    [...] E’ uscita l’ultima parte del post di Solution Watch che propone la terza parte della molto variegata recensione di applicazioni web 2.0 per insegnanti e studenti da utilizzare in ambito educativo. [...]

  7. Maestro Alberto says:

    Very good job! Thanks from Italy!

    Maestro Alberto Piccini :-)

  8. Don’t Drink The Coffee » Detailed analysis of Web 2.0 in education says:

    [...] read more | digg story [...]

  9. Still more Classroom 2.0 « the reflective teacher says:

    [...] Brian Benzinger at Solution Watch is back with the third installment of Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0, a series of posts related to online applications useful for both students and teachers. [...]

  10. Brian Benzinger says:

    @James – Glad you liked the article. That is fantastic that you guys are handing out 100,000 wikis. It’s great to hear of companies being so pro-active with education. Keep it up!

    @Paul – Thanks for informing about the other tech universities offering Web 2.0 courses. I’m going to have to look into that. Man, kids are so lucky these days… I had nothing like this! ;-)

    @Maestro – Glad you liked it!

  11. Rich says:

    Another Fantastic resource for Educators it the Greenbush Education Service Center Podcast Directory here – http://podcast.greenbush.us

  12. maestroalberto » Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (terza parte) says:

    [...] E’ uscita l’ultima parte del post di Solution Watch che propone la terza parte della molto variegata recensione di applicazioni web 2.0 per insegnanti e studenti da utilizzare in ambito educativo. [...]

  13. Web 2.0 and education « Entertaining Research says:

    [...] Here is a small-ish post about how Web 2.0 can make the academic world more transparent. And, here is a rather lengthy apprisal of Web 2.0 in higher education: Finally, Part 3 of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0” series is here. During the last few weeks I have researched possible scenarios and real case studies of Web 2.0 in education in hopes to show others where we are with today’s education and where it could be. The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more. Also, if you are new to the series, don’t forget about Part 1 and Part 2! [...]

  14. dave says:

    dude, the 3rd excellent roundup in a string of 3 outstanding roundups…would you please consider creating some kind of dabbledb collection (easier to search) and that way you could continue to review and add in an easy to search format…honestly, these three columns (or others coming) oughta be merged into one big one with a link up top in nav, very useful to track the players (in context) with actual thoughts and reviews, versus the office2.0 dbase which jsut tracks quick notes….

  15. Baby Monster Dad says:

    Great series of articles. Hey, I just realized that my 6 year old daughter and I have a Web 2.0 site, at least I think it is. And to think, only yesterday I was calling My Baby Monsters a collaborative storytelling community where children from around the world build stories together. They grow up so fast. http://mybabymonsters.com

  16. G French says:

    Thanks for another useful and detailed article- I’ve signed up for a closer look at Yacapaca, and I wish I’d seen some of the resources you suggest for podcasting a few weeks earlier. Nice work!

  17. ray says:

    Pity you didn’t mention p2p helping teachers deliver better learning – dugg here
    http://digg.com/software/p2p_eLearning_the_holy_grail_of_Education_create_your_e_course_now

  18. Mario tout de go says:

    Welcome to the people of «LeWeb3» conference…

    Let me introduce you in my environment, a professionnal ePortfolio where I publish what I learn. I started blogging in october 2002 as principal of a school. At this moment, I was looking for a tool who can improve learning……

  19. joelogs says:

    Any school anywhere can be up to speed on this in no time. Indeed, one undergraduate course had already been taught and a paper presented on the results in late June 2006 in Manila.

  20. ???? » Web 2.0 ????? says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 [Part 1][Part 2][Part 3] [...]

  21. ????????? » Web 2.0 ????? says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 [Part 1][Part 2][Part 3] [...]

  22. links for 2006-10-30 « Commonplace Book says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 (tags: school education toread) [...]

  23. links for 2006-10-30 « El weblog de Sr. Hogg says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 (tags: education web) [...]

  24. dave says:

    hey, i think you covered this before, but for mac users who also want to manage docs and files OFFline and use the same sort of tag systems and folksonomy, you can still get “yip” for free at http://www.thekip.com/, it’s a sweet little app, like iphoto sorta, but for productivity…

  25. Dhiraj Gupta says:

    Excellent post, Brian. Kind of reminds me of the time when we (my company Cynapse) were doing a project for INSEAD – we implemented a custom blog for the business school where teachers would hand down assignments to all the b-school students which would appear in their own individual blogs as assignment questions.

    The students would create a post designated to be their assignment reply and the teachers would grade them from a central location, the grade would appear right on their individual blogs. The project was quite successful – one thing I remember noticing was that, like you point out, students liked to post more than just their assignments, and loved linking to each other’s blogs, it was a growing, vibrant community all within one classroom.

    I think new media and web2.0 have a great place in education, with benefits which are not well recognized at all.

    Recently we launched our own enterprise bliki platform at http://cyn.in and the response has been nothing short of terrific. We offer special packages to universities and educational institutions (though we don’t talk much about it on the site) – one specific advantage we offer is the enhaced privacy and security that a public wiki or blog cannot offer. Do check it out, when you have the time.

    I love your long, thoroughly intersting review posts like these, do keep ‘em coming. :)

  26. EveryDigg » Blog Archive » Detailed analysis of Web 2.0 in education says:

    [...] Analysis and real-word examples of Web 2.0 used in the classroom covering blogging, photo sharing, podcasting, wikis, video sharing, and more.read more | digg story Links [...]

  27. links for 2006-10-30 at twopointouch: web 2.0, blogs and social media says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more. (tags: education web2.0 technology learning) Filed under: Links   |   Tags: No Tags. [...]

  28. le semeur» Blog Archive » links for 2006-10-30 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 (tags: web2.0) Attracteurs sur del.icio.us/lesemeur/ [...]

  29. Candace Hackett Shively says:

    If your readers would like to see a step-by-step for teachers on using Gated Blogs in the Classroom (to stay within district policies and ease parental concerns), see specific ideas for blog use, and read reviews of different blogging tools, all in a teacher-friendly form, TeachersFirst (not-for-profit, free) has it here.

  30. School in Web 2.0 perspective at Web 2.0 Log says:

    [...] I found a really interesting post from Solution Watch: Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3, what is about integrating Web 2.0 solutions in your classroom. It’s great to see, our Minor uses much of these possibilities, but there are many more discussed in the article. [...]

  31. Bert76 says:

    Excellent stuff, tnx Brian!
    You mentioned Bloglines, I prefer https://www.newsgator.com/ though

  32. We build or functional spec with Flickr at Web 2.0 Log says:

    [...] So we got a lot of photos, we needed to prove in a simple way that we’re competent and we needed to know the opinion of the public. And I thought about our photos and flickr. And I recently saw in this article an example on flickr where education and discussion are combined within one foto. This inspired me a lot! [...]

  33. edublogging « Someday I Will Treat You Good says:

    [...] Part 3 - Real life examples of Web 2.0 in schools   [...]

  34. EduPodcast » Blog Archive » Web Docet 9. Studiare è bene, con passione è meglio says:

    [...] School 2.0: la terza parte delle applicazioni collaborative per la didattica [Solution Watch, Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: part 3, 28 Ottobre 2006; Alberto Piccini, Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (terza parte), 28 Ottobre 2006] [...]

  35. Preoccupations says:

    The knowledge…

    From time to time, there’s a flurry of memorable postings or remarks about knowledge, education and contemporary culture … David Wilcox picked up on something George Siemens wrote: Content is no longer the value point of education (it never really…

  36. lemasney.com » Blog Archive » links for 2006-10-29 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 Finally, Part 3 of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0” series is here. During the last few weeks I have researched possible scenarios and real case studies of Web 2.0 in education in hopes to show others where we are with today’s educatio (tags: tools rider development technology) [...]

  37. IMYM Tutorials : Back to school With Web 2.0 - Part 3 says:

    [...] Back to School with Web 2.0 – Part 3 was posted recently. This is a great series written by Brian Benzinger at the Solution Watch blog.  In my humble opinion, it is a must read for any teacher working with technology in their classrooms.  I was really astonished when I clicked on the About but on the blog to discover Brian is only 19 years old.  Terrific work! Click on the links to read Part 1 and Part 2. Wednesday, November 08, 2006 4:53 AM joevans Filed under: Instructional Discussion Topics, Technology in the Classroom, Thought Provoking, Pedagogically Speaking [...]

  38. Using Wiki in Education » Blog Archive » The reverse Wikipedia argument says:

    [...] Brian Benzinger, author of the blog Solution Watch has an excellent piece called “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0“, and in Part 3 he discusses Wikipedia and wiki use in education. He mentions Vicki Davis and her groundbreaking work integrating the wiki into her teaching, and includes her reflection on the debate about the integrity of information in Wikipedia: [...]

  39. WCS Technology Integration | The Class of Web 2.0 says:

    [...] An article at solution watch says: I often found, and many teachers have noted this as well, that the students would publish to their school blogs even when not instructed to. Students really enjoy reaching out to the world and they are so motivated by it that they want to write even more. They would describe how there day was, what they learned in class, or even things they learned or read on the news that day. It’s amazing. [...]

  40. Salich says:

    Thanks For All :) and thanx for post Brian

    http://www.sesver.net

  41. Maestro Alberto » Nono appuntamento con Web Docet: “Studiare è bene, con passione è meglio” says:

    [...] School 2.0: la terza parte delle applicazioni collaborative per la didattica [Solution Watch, Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: part 3, 28 Ottobre 2006; Alberto Piccini, Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (terza parte), 28 Ottobre 2006] [...]

  42. Jon Bourne says:

  43. Ryan205 says:

    Thanks again for these posts. I love reading what you have to say. I was especially interested in what you had to say about bloggs. As a student I have just started to get into them. I first heard about bloggs in one of my education classes. There we learned how we could use bloggs in our lessons to benefit our students. But are there bloggs always benefits? I wonder about your comment “In blogging, there are no set standards, no boundaries, no restrictions confining you to conform your thoughts to any given set of rules and regulations.” This kind of scares me. I think there should be boundaries, and restrictions. If your want to use bloggs to benefits students in approving their writing, shouldn’t they have standers and guidelines? Don’t get me wrong I love to write freely with out worrying about all of that, but just a thought. Also I know in some school around this area, they have been having problems with student using bloggs to harass other students. Should student be held responsible for comments they make on their bloggs? Bloggs are wonderful things but can also be use for negative reasons.

  44. Apex Consulting Blog » Blog Archive » Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 says:

    [...] Finally, Part 3 of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0” series is here. During the last few weeks I have researched possible scenarios and real case studies of Web 2.0 in education in hopes to show others where we are with today’s education and where it could be. The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more. Also, if you are new to the series, don’t forget about Part 1 and Part 2! [...]

  45. ?????? » ?????web2.0???????? says:

    [...] ?????Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3?????Brian Benzinger???Sicilia Yuan ,Phoebe Yue, Danny Yu???Danny Yu  [...]

  46. Derek Seabrook says:

    I have not seen so much traffic to my sites over the last few months it seems as though the internet is speeding up,

    but my sales have increased slightly but not as much in percentages as my traffic, could this be due to more surfers online, or what?

    has anybody else seen the same or not, I have owned several websites over the past 2 to 3 years,

    and have never seen the traffic increase as much as now, but not the sales as yet in tune with the increase in traffic.

  47. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 [...]

  48. Johnie says:

    One of the best locations I’ve come across lately!!! Definately a permanent bookmark!

  49. Wyoming says:

    Thank you, I just wanted to give a greeting and tell you I like your website very much.

  50. Web 2.0 Tools & You : Off the Shelf says:

    [...] I really like Part 3, as it addresses some things I have already been thinking about, namely educational blogging, photo sharing with Flickr, educational podcasting, Wikipedia and Wikis, and video sharing.  [...]

  51. e-learning Now » Blog Archive » Flickr in Education says:

    [...] From Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 by Brian Benzinger. Web Link [...]

  52. Sajith says:

    Perhaps http://tutorom.com will also fall into the category of a web2.0 e-learning service

  53. LiSa DoWlInG!!..XxX says:

    w3l i tink tat skul iz important coz lyk eh we wu al be dumb witouut it lol haha! da al i want ta say bubi!! XxXxX

  54. none says:

    “They would describe how there day was” or *their* day

  55. e-learning Now » Blog Archive » Student created content using wikis says:

    [...] Full article [...]

  56. ?????web2.0???????? | ?????? says:

    [...] ?????Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 ?????Brian Benzinger ???Sicilia Yuan ,Phoebe Yue, Danny Yu ???Danny Yu ???“?????Web2.0??”??????????????????????Web2.0????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????web2.0??, School2.0(??2.0)?????????????????????????? ? ????? [...]

  57. zymee.com says:

    Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3…

    The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more….

  58. Grosshandel says:

    I think there should be boundaries, and restrictions. If your want to use bloggs to benefits students in approving their writing, shouldn’t they have standers and guidelines? Don’t get me wrong I love to write freely with out worrying about all of that, but just a thought.

  59. Tim Shadoz says:

    Wikis are very prominent for education purposes especially at my school, several of my classes have their own, simple wikis.

  60. Zaidimai says:

    Thanks For All and i read about it flickr, i use this website and i happy so much

  61. Propiedad Privada » Blog Archive » De link varia says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 partes Uno, Dos y Tres es una cuidada recopilación de SolutionWatch de recursos útiles en Internet para e-Learning. [...]

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  63. Troy says:

    Brian, your post covers some of the near-term options in School 2.0, and we haven’t even seen what happens when incumbents partipiate (or are forced to).

    School districts aren’t known for scrappy, cheap solutions, nor for kick-ass web applications, transparency, or public-facing SaaS services. But when existing work appears as open source, we’ll start to see freedom to tinker from clued developers amidst the PTA population.

  64. Team Building Activities says:

    At home, you can teach your family to work together as a team as well. One common example of this is the preparation of meals and the cleanup afterwards. Cooking can be a solitary pursuit or it can be a team effort. You can give tasks to each member of the family. I remember sitting with my mother in the kitchen picking the silk off corn and snapping fresh green beans in half for my grandmother to cook. After a meal prepared as a team is enjoyed, you can use teamwork to clean the mess. An example of this would be doing dishes. One person washes, one person rinses, one person dries and one person puts the dishes away. You can of course create variations on family teamwork to best suit your family’s preferences and needs. No matter how you cultivate a stronger team, you are sure to see real benefits of teamwork in various areas of your life.

  65. Julie Schelhorn says:

    Blogging sounds like a great tool for students and teachers to use together. I truly don’t think it is appropriate for the primary grades, but rather for older students who already know the basics about computers and the internet. I would love to try a blog in my class. I must say that I would only do it if all the children in my class had access to a computer. I would think that I would need parent permission to have a blog for my class. I would want 100% participation or nothing at all! I’m looking forward to learning more about blogs. I think it would be an awesome tool for the PAL program that I run at school. Often times we run short on time and a blog would allow for us to continue conversations, thoughts, feelings, and lessons learned. Again, I’m not sure all students would have access or the ability to use the site.

  66. Howard says:

    I never even CONTEMPLATED the use of blogs in the classroom. I think, especially on certain topics like evolution and such, that they would make an excellent accessory!

  67. Ms. Nguyen says:

    THanks for the informative article! I am starting to use more technology in the classroom and the students are fascinated by it! Pretty soon we will be getting a SMartboard and we will use online technology all the time! thanks for the useful sites and info!

  68. education » Blog Archive » Detailed analysis of Web 2.0 in education says:

    [...] read more | digg story [...]

  69. Second Life | downtherabbithole says:

    [...] An online article here is a good place to start as is the fabulous third instalment of ‘Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0′ which is a really comprehensive list and commentary of ways to use the web for learners and teachers. A one stop shop really. [...]

  70. » Second Life downtherabbithole says:

    [...] An online article here is a good place to start as is the fabulous third instalment of ‘Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0′ which is a really comprehensive list and commentary of ways to use the web for learners and teachers. A one stop shop really. [...]