This is part two of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0″ series. In this article, I will cover web-based alternatives to desktop office applications including: word processing, presentations, diagrams, spreadsheets, and more. If you are new to the series and want to learn more about educations tools, I recommend reading Part 1 of the series. If you enjoy Part 1 and Part 2, I hope you will stick around for Part 3 where I will cover real cases of Web 2.0 used in classrooms around the world.

There are a few office applications I have left out in this series. First, many would argue email applications are part of an office suite, and I agree to that, but I have not included a category for them in this post because most colleges and schools provide email to students as is. If I were to recommend one, I’d say Gmail for its features and offered space. I have also left out database applications as I don’t feel they are essential to a student unless they are majoring in computer science or related, in which case they would likely use Microsoft Access or a school DBMS (Database Management System) – not to mention that the Web 2.0 database applications are more geared towards a completely different ball park. Additionally, I have decided to leave out imaging and project management applications.

This article has three sections to it: “Office Applications,” “Web-based Word Processors Compared,” and “Are Web-based Office Applications Ready for Education?” Also, be sure to check out the comparison grid, or feature matrix, in the “Web-based Word Processors Compared” section.

Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1
Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3

Red Arrows indicate personal favorites with education in mind.
Products may appear more than once if related to multiple categories.

Part 2: Office Applications

Word Processing

  • Writely: Online Word Processor allowing users to create and edit documents collaboratively online, import Word documents, publicly or privately share documents, publish to a blog, and more.
  • Zoho Writer: Similar to Writely, Zoho Writer is an Online Word Processor where you can create, share, and collaborate on documents. Users can also publish to a blog, import and export documents, and make documents public.
  • Writeboard: Writeboard is a collaborative writing tool where users can write, share, revise, and compare their documents online with others. It is not an advanced system featuring a WYSIWYG editor, Ajax, and flashy effects, but that’s what I like about it. Writeboard is a personal favorite of mine and as a matter of fact I am using it right now for this very post. It includes version control with text comparing and is great for essays and writeups of any kind. More on Writeboard.
  • ThinkFree Write: ThinkFree Write is a free word processor that, at this time, is probably the closest you can get to an online version of Microsoft Office with features and appearance in mind. You can perform formatting options, create tables, add a header/footer, and spell check as you type just like your average desktop word processor. Pretty impressive. You can also open and save Microsoft Word and OpenOffice documents as well as share documents online with others. Note: There are two versions of ThinkFree Write: Quick Edit (Ajax-based) and Power Edit (Java-based).
  • AjaxWrite: Lightweight word processor that can read and write Microsoft Word and other standard document formats, display multiple documents at once in tabs, and feature basic formatting. However, feature wise, it just does not cut it for me. What I do like about it is that it’s very quick and there are no signups – get in and get out.

Presentations

  • Zoho Show: Web-based presentation tool to create, edit, publish, and show presentations. Zoho Show is very feature packed allowing users to create presentations full of text, images, shapes, lists, and pre-formated content templates. Users can also import their existing PowerPoint and OpenOffice presentations, view presentations online, and export as HTML.
  • Thumbstacks: With Thumbstacks, create and share web-based presentations over the web. Thumbstacks provides a clean and easy to use presentation builder, although not as feature rich as Zoho Show, and allows users to export presentations in HTML format.
  • SlideShare: Great new service, currently available by invitation only, that consists of an YouTube-like site for Powerpoint and OpenOffice presentations displaying presentations through Flash players. Users can even place the Flash presentation players on their own websites. I’ve been waiting for a site similar to this for some time now; perfect for students and educators wanting to store presentations online for sharing and receiving feedback.
  • Empressr: Empressr is an Ajax and Flash-based service that lets you create and share presentations online. One advantage on the feature side is that it uses Flash and Ajax rather than HTML and Ajax allowing you to add more media then other tools including audio and video, although I personally prefer HTML presentations.
  • ThinkFree Show: Excellent Java-based presentation application that feels much like Microsoft Powerpoint. Create rich presentations and play them through the online editor or by graphic. You can also save your presentations for viewing in Microsoft Powerpoint and share them with others online.

Diagrams and Mind Mapping

  • Mayomi: Mayomi is a free flash-based mind mapping tool that lets you map out ideas, projects, research topics, or anything else that can be dug into. Great for students when it comes to writing essays. More on Mayomi.
  • Gliffy: Draw and share diagrams online using Gliffy. You get all of your basic functionality that you would in an offline diagram application but with a few extra bonuses like working online collaboratively and dynamic publishing of diagrams. Create flow charts, floor plans, technical diagrams, and more.
  • mxGraph: mxGraph is a very impressive JavaScript based diagramming library where users can create advanced diagrams within their browser. The only catch is that it is not a hosted solution where users can create and save diagrams. It is a library in which companies, and probably schools, can use under the mxGraph license. I’d love for it to be a hosted solution, like Gliffy.

Spreadsheets

  • Google Spreadsheets: Create, store and share spreadsheets on the web. Includes real time editing and chatting with others as well as import and export options. Google Spreadsheets is my web-based spreadsheet application of choice, although on the negative side, it does not provide chart functionality.
  • EditGrid: “An online spreadsheet featuring real-time-update and extensive collaboration features.” EditGrid has support for more then 500 functions, includes remote data update, access control, and more.
  • iRows: Create and share spreadsheets online, create charts, include dynamic information, and upload and save Excel, CSV and OpenDocument files. More on iRows.
  • Zoho Sheet: “Zoho Sheet is a web based alternative to traditional spreadsheet applications, like MS Excel or Openoffice Calc. It provides basic spreadsheet functionalities coupled with web based features like sharing, tagging, publishing and more.”
  • Num Sum: Possibly the first web-based spreadsheet service launched that introduced social spreadsheets where users can tag their spreadsheets and share with others.
  • ThinkFree Calc: Java-based spreadsheet application that has the look and feel of Microsoft Excel. Users can share their spreadsheets and work on them collaboratively online.
  • Numbler: Simple online spreadsheet solution with great real-time editing and chatting with multiple users. Nice and clean interface although not as feature packed as some of the other options.

Calendars

  • 30 Boxes: 30 Boxes is an online calendar that I feel works great for students due to its simplicity and sharing options. It also features RSS subscription to automatically populate the calendar with feed items on the day they were published – great for tracking teacher blogs and academic feeds. Furthermore, users can access their calendars on the go with 30 Boxes Mobile.
  • Google Calendar: A bit on the advanced side, but once you get used to it, you’ll find it’s quite powerful. Users can create multiple calendars; view by day, week, or month; share their calendars with the web or a select few; subscribe to other shared calendars; and more. More on Google Calendar.
  • Spongecell: “A free and easy to use calendar for you and your friends.” Features a simple drag and drop interface where events can be created and viewed on calendars in multiple formats. Users can also share their calendars with others.
  • CalendarHub: CalendarHub offers a great service for personal and group use offering a simple drag and drop interface, calendar subscribing, reminder notification, and more. More on CalendarHub.

Miscellaneous

  • Scanr: Scanr is an interesting product great for those without access to a scanner. Scan, copy and fax whiteboards, documents, and business cards with just a camera phone or digital camera! Great for research at the library and creating a backup of printed class handouts on the computer.
  • eFax: Although this may not be that useful for students, I felt it’s worth mentioning. eFax lets users receive faxes through email for free simply by providing them with a temporary phone number that senders can use to send their documents. eFax is free for receiving faxes but will cost you to send them out (eFax Plans).
  • Gmail: Generally, most colleges and schools provide email, but if you’re an High School student, chances are you weren’t given one. I’d personally recommend Gmail for its features and space, however you may have trouble using it in schools due to its chat functionality.
  • Google Page Creator: Users can create quality sites without learning HTML or any other technical knowledge, although they can use them if they wish. You get 100MB of space for yoursite.googlepages.com and can upload files and attach gadgets to your pages. Here’s an example site I created in just a minute with Part 1 of this series. Dead simple, but presentable.
  • Zoho Creator: Can’t find a product that does what you want? Try creating your own. Zoho Creator allows its users to structure a database, insert and connect data, and publically share it with others.

Web-based Word Processors Compared

Throughout my educational career as a student, I know that the program I spent most of my time in was Microsoft Word. In college, every teacher requested that we type our assignments up and send them to their email address so they can “easily” download, review, and email back with changes. It’s a process, and it works, but with today’s technology and offerings, things can be much simpler. Imagine one location where students compose and publish papers accessible online and a place where teachers can collaborate with their students without the need to download or email a single document.

After compiling a list of online word processors for this series, I decided to seperately research each one to find if they are ready for educational use. I realize that services like Writely are excellent for users like me, using it to compose and collaborate on documents for Parallel (my company), but what about students when it comes to assignments that are required to follow certain formatting? Can these web-based word processors handle it?

Time to put web-based word processors to the test! First, I created an account over at Competitious to easily list common word processor features and view a comparison grid displaying features from each product. I then went through features of Writely, Zoho Writer, AjaxWrite, and ThinkFree Write (Online). After viewing the results, it was clear which were capable of following common writing and paper guidelines.

Page & Text Formatting

Student papers don’t require too much formatting, but there are guidelines and structures to be followed – for example, MLA Formatting on research papers. Will we be using web-based products to work on these kind of papers? I can’t say, but I would imagine that we would need to if there are hopes for entire web office suites in the future. During my High School and College career, I’ve had to change document margins, add headers and footers, double space sentences (or often 1.5 space), and enable page numbering. Are web-based word processors capable of such formatting? To find out, I have tested each one looking for text formatting options and page formatting options. Can users bold text, add paragraph styles (Heading 1, Paragraph, Blockquote), double space lines, make page breaks, and add page numbers to the header of each page?

Writely and Zoho Writer are similar in that they offer all of your basic text formatting options, including: bold, italic, paragraph styles (Normal, Heading, Paragraph), and line spacing, but lacked when it came to page formatting only allowing for page breaks. AjaxWrite fell behind when it came to paragraph styling, line spacing, and document formating. Lastly, ThinkFree passed with flying colors featuring text formatting options and page formatting options. It had margins, page breaks, page numbering, and even custom headers and footers. It’s practically Microsoft Word online in appearance and functionality.

Functionality

I want in a word processor, in terms of functionality, spell checking, copy & paste, undo & redo, find & replace, auto-save/backup, and at times, word count. These are functions that I use regularly when working on papers and I assume others as well. Fortunately, all the processors had these functions, except for Zoho Writer not having word count and AjaxLaunch without spell checking, backup options, or word count – didn’t even prompt me when “accidently” closing an unsaved document.

Collaborative Value and Sharing

One advantage is that these products are web based. You can access your documents anywhere at any time and work on them as you normally would. Being web-based also allows you to share documents with others and work on them collaboratively. Users can even work on documents together in real-time from different locations or even post to their blog.

Writely has five stars in this department making it very simple for anyone to publicly or privately share documents, tag documents, compare versions, add comments, subscribe to RSS, and best of all, collaborate in real-time. Zoho Writer had similar results, except I found it a little more confusing to use and had a rough time finding an RSS feed. AjaxWrite had no collaborative functionality or sharing options at all, though its purpose is to simply act as a word processor. Lastly, ThinkFree featured public sharing, tagging, version control, and commenting, but no real-time collaboration like Writely and Zoho.

Feature Matrix

Thanks to Competitious for their great service (expect a review soon), I was able to easily create and manage a Feature Matrix. Competitious does not offer exporting of the Feature Matrix at this time, but they have kindly allowed me to use it for this post.

The matrix covers formatting, document structure, functionality, document objects, collaboration, exporting, and importing. If you have any suggestions about this feature matrix, please feel free to pass it by me and I will change it. I tried to only include common features in word processors, so if you think something is missing that should be there, please let me know.

Summary

These applications are impressive, but not quite there yet. ThinkFree is the only one that was capable of producing an MLA formatted document with double spaced lines, 1-inch margins and headers with my last name and page number. The only problem I had with it though was the fact the interface was so similar to Microsoft Word (confusing and intimidating) and that is was Java-based. Writely on the other hand had an excellent interface that was very inviting with great collaborative features. Zoho Writer had similar results as Writely, but I found the interface to be a little confusing and I deeply missed the top menus you see in applications these days (File, Edit, View, Help, etc.) which made it harder to look for specific functionality. Finally, AjaxWrite did fair in my opinion, acting as a basic word processor but just didn’t cut it for me due to the lack of features.

Are Web-based Office Applications Ready for Education?

As you can tell by the compilation above, Web Office is nearing. But are these applications ready for any main-stream attention? Should we just drop the desktop counterparts and start using Web 2.0 (or Office 2.0) products? In my opinion, not yet, but we’re certainly getting closer to the possibility.

Who knows when it will happen? Maybe in a couple years, or maybe five. What I do know is that right now, web-based office products are on a roll with new enhancements week after week because of technology improving day after day. Not to mention, they’ve got some pretty convincing features to switch for already including collaborative editing, document sharing, online storage, and so on. Did I mention they’re free? At the same time, they lack some important functionality, such as: document formatting (margins, headers, footers, page numbering); adding sounds and video to presentations; and advanced spreadsheeting with charts and forms. Also keep in mind dependence on Internet connection and possible security issues.

All in all, I do not feel school systems or businesses should immediately jump on the Web 2.0 train, but I think it’s time they start considering it as an option and try some of the solutions it has to offer. Try some of the applications for a week or two and find if they work for you. If your a teacher, see if your class prefers writing in the friendly and social Writely, or the intimidating and feature packed Microsoft Word. Some teachers are already doing it (you will see real cases of this in Part 3 of the series). Why not you?


94 Comments on “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2”

  1. Diogo Azevedo says:

    Great article!
    Waiting for Part 3. :-)

  2. Sid Yadav says:

    Really awesome and informative article, Brian.

    Have learnt so much in part 1 & 2, waiting for part 3 now… :-)

  3. Adam Wulf says:

    For calendars, be sure to check out Jotlet.net. It’s extemely simple, very fast, and beautiful to look at.

  4. Arvind says:

    A very good & detailed post, Brian! Waiting for Part 3. Thanks a lot for including Zoho Writer, Sheet, Show & Creator as part of the post!

    About Zoho Writer, it does have a word/character count funtion. Click on Save and you will get a pop-up at the right-bottom giving you the word/character count. And, as for the absence of typical desktop app menus (like File, Edit, View), we wanted users to access most of the functions in a single click and hence the present design. We will see how best we can enhance this further. And, we will be including page formatting options also soon.

  5. Brian Benzinger says:

    Arvind – Excellent. That’s great to hear. Didn’t notice the word count last I saved a document. I’ll check it out again. Also, can’t wait for the formatting options. Keep up the great work.

    I’ll update my post stating that it has word count when I can. WordPress is giving me some database troubles right now and won’t let me edit anything. Driving me crazy.

  6. Chris Matthieu says:

    Great post! You should also check out Docly for online word processing. It’s similar to the ones that you liksted but with one major distinction – published articles are automatically copyrighted through Numly.

  7. The Third Bit » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 Tools for School says:

    [...] Via SolutionWatch, a list of Web 2.0 tools for students and teachers. This is the first in a three-part series; lots of good ideas here. (Part 2 is online.) [...]

  8. Marina making pictures says:

    Great article, it makes my day. The list of online text processors realy helps me with my project.

    Thank you for sharing this article with me !

  9. bpvrm.net » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 Functional Apps says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  10. bpvrm.net » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 Functional Apps says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  11. Gavin Choate says:

    First of all, very informative article. Thanks!

    Another one to be noted (no pun intended) is the one my name links to (www.universitynotes.net). Free service available to all college students allowing them to share notes, study guides, old exams, etc etc.

  12. nimsey says:

    Citation Machine http://citationmachine.net/ is a great way to find out how to make those tricky citations for online references. both MLA and APA styles.

  13. alex says:

    #8: I think those sites were listed in part 1…

  14. lydia says:

    fabulous list, thanks!

  15. yeago says:

    Oui, tres agreable. =) One thing this list left out was student textbook exchanges!!

    http://www.bookproxy.com. — nifty, 2.0ish.

  16. huffenglish.com » del.icio.us says:

    [...] My first link is something you may have seen if you regularly read The Reflective Teacher. A few days ago, he posted a link to Brian Benzinger’s post “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1” at Solution Watch. I don’t constantly bug my colleagues with links, but I thought this one was so valuable, I not only sent it to the entire faculty at my school, but also shared some of it with my students. One of my students told me he has already tried the application Gradefix and loves it. Brian now has Part 2 up, so check it out, too. [...]

  17. Web 2.0 für Lehrer und Studenten » ar.kadi.us says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  18. Vassilis says:

    Is there an online calendar that offers sync with Outlook or Palm Desktop? That would be very useful for obvious reasons…

  19. links for 2006-10-08 « Commonplace Book says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 (tags: education school web2.0 toread) [...]

  20. Call-151 » Blog Archive » Web Office Feature Comparison Matrix says:

    [...] ???? : Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  21. Grym’s Rant » Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for School says:

    [...] Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for students and teachers. The article also compares four popular web-based word processors and asks if Web 2.0 applications are ready for education.read more | digg story [...]

  22. Jewel Makda says:

    The was a fabulous article! Before I was even finished reading this I created 5 accounts with some of the tools you mentioned. What a wonderful plethora of tools. Thanks!

  23. Martini O’Clock » Blog Archive » links for 2006-10-08 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 Applications available on the web that are good for education. (tags: web2.0 tools learning socialsoftware free list internet education) [...]

  24. thanhthanhthanh says:

    dao duy thanh_nguyen ngoc hue_nguyen thi phuong thao

  25. TechandBabes.com » Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for School says:

    [...] Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for students and teachers. The article also compares four popular web-based word processors and asks if Web 2.0 applications are ready for education.read more | digg story More: [...]

  26. maestroalberto » Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (parte seconda) says:

    [...] E’ finalmente uscita la seconda parte dell’interessantissimo post di Solution Watch che propone la seconda parte della molto variegata lista di applicazioni web 2.0 per insegnanti e studenti che cercano prodotti e tecnologie da utilizzare nell’anno scolastico appena iniziato. [...]

  27. dave says:

    dude, once again this is outstanding – particularly your own evaluations and comparisons…but why go to the trouble of creating a static page> you could build out this whole resource with the office 2.0 db and add reviews (which are sorely needed, particularly like the one you just did above)

    dabbledb is a free tool to do this, and you can download the set at: http://itredux.com/office-20/database/

  28. GADGET Blog » Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for School says:

    [...] Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for students and teachers. The article also compares four popular web-based word processors and asks if Web 2.0 applications are ready for education.read more | digg story Filed under: Gadgets by — TechManager @ 20:46 [...]

  29. I12know’s blog » Blog Archive » Bookmarks of the week says:

    [...] The other links this week are: (08 Oct) – A List of Amazon S3 Backup Tools (by Jeremy Zawodny) – have your stuff get backup by Amazon infrastructure. (08 Oct) – Kick Ass Classical – Classical Music’s Top 100 Greatest Hits (08 Oct) – Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 – Focus on office-like tools. (07 Oct) – What is a Church? Biblical Basics for Christian Community This is an excellent series from MRoberts! (07 Oct) – Where We Are and How We Got Here | Christianity Today | A Magazine of Evangelical Conviction – Wow, excellent analysis.  What a broad stroke of church history in the past 50 years! (07 Oct) – What’s Next: Local Church | Christianity Today | A Magazine of Evangelical Conviction – some discussion about what is needed at the local churches in the future [...]

  30. Akkam’s Razor says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 (tags: WEB2.0 tools education internet free) [...]

  31. links for 2006-10-09 « Free Hogg. says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 (tags: education web webapps) [...]

  32. redleo - educational solutions » Blog Archive » back to school with web 2.0 says:

    [...] brian benzinger, solutionwatch, tried personally and put together list of classroom tools, also web 2.0 based ones (part 1), and classroom tools, also web 2.0 based ones (part 2). [...]

  33. David Lee says:

    Hi Brian,

    Thanks for giving EditGrid a mention in your well written article. May I invite you to try out EditGrid’s charting function? Try our demo here:
    http://www.editgrid.com/tnc/cliff/Charts_Demo.copy

    Some of our users are using our chart function to create pretty complicated charts and share with others.
    http://www.editgrid.com/user/pierro78/seattlefrancophone

    David
    EditGrid Team

  34. Brian says:

    Very good articles and full of information. One question though. What happens, and you know it will, when you can’t get to the web? Sure, many schools have wireless all across campus, but what happens if you are sitting in a class that had wireless and today it is down? What about off campus and needing the data? How about services that allow the data to be worked on at the desktop then uploaded? Seems far more logical and safe.

  35. Blogging Gelle » Blog Archive » The Virtually Free Office says:

    [...] Other alternatives to the applications I have described is the whole Zoho suite, WideWord, TeamSlide and many more. [...]

  36. Tools for School 2: Office Apps « Think Big - Library 9.95 says:

    [...] Brian Benzinger posted Part 2 of his article: Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 over at Solution Watch.  Brian looks at Web 2.0 applications for word processing, presentations, diagrams and mind mapping, spreadsheets, calendars, and some miscellaneous utilities.  Brian compares web-based word processors in depth, exploring page and text formatting, fuctionality, and collaborative value and sharing.  He created a nice feature matrix for the word processing applications he reviewed. [...]

  37. Basement Tapes » Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  38. soulsoup » » Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 e-learning blog, elearning blog, knowledge management, e-learning strategy, learning experience design, usability says:

    [...] From Solution Watch : Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  39. EveryDigg » Blog Archive » Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for School says:

    [...] Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for students and teachers. The article also compares four popular web-based word processors and asks if Web 2.0 applications are ready for education.read more | digg story [...]

  40. hindu says:

    Wow what a great post, I learned so much from this blog. Web 2.0 has so much to offer!

  41. Brent says:

    Try AirSet for your calendar. http://www.airset.com

  42. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 at The Round-Up says:

    [...] Link: Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 [...]

  43. EduPodcast » Blog Archive » Web Docet 6. Ritorno alla scuola del futuro. says:

    [...] Ritorno al futuro: la scuola 2.0 [”Back to school with the class of web 2.0 - part 1” e “Back to school with the class of web 2.0 - part 2“, Solution Watch, 29 settembre e 6 ottobre 2006; Alberto Piccini,”Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del web 2.0 - prima parte” e “Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del web 2.0 - parte seconda“, 1 ottobre e 8 ottobre 2006] [...]

  44. English Education Professor » Resources for English Education Professors & English Teachers by Todd Finley, PhD » Blog Archive » 5 Free PowerPoint Killers: Put Presentations Online says:

    [...] From Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2: [...]

  45. Michael says:

    What about http://www.acatopia.org ? It allows students and teachers to ask and answer questions about any book!

  46. ryan ed 205 says:

    I really enjoyed this blogg . There were so many helpful hint that i plan on using. I actually am using ZOHO to write my response. I’m so glad i ran in to this. I cant wait for your next one. It is too bad everybody doesn’t know about this, I’m sure people would use it. As time goes on i bet this is only going to get better. Do you really think these website will take the place of desktop applications? How far into the future?

  47. School 2.0 at Sparkplug 9 >> bizhack says:

    [...] Back to School – part one Back to School – part two [...]

  48. Betty-Jo says:

    You should really check out Famundo, http://www.famundo.com, as a calendaring solution. It’s pretty new, but they make a version for schools and it also has document storage and a place to leave message for your parents. Plus it’s free for schools.

  49. ZPID-Blog zu E-Learning in der Psychologie - Eintrag-Details: Web 2.0 Anwendungen für Lehren und Lernen says:

    [...] Im Solution Watch Blog ist eine schöne Zusammenstellung von Web 2.0 Werkzeugen, die in Schule und Universität eingesetzt werden können. Der erste Teil der Artikelserie behandelt u.a. Organizer, Notenverwaltung, Mathematikanwendungen, Notizen, Applikationen für die Verwaltung von Literatur und Lesezeichen. Im zweiten Teil werden web-basierte Office-Anwendungen vorgestellt, wobei ein besonderes Augenmerk auf web-basierte Textverarbeitungsprogramme gelegt wird. Insbesondere das Formatieren von Dokumenten nach vorgegebenen Richtlinien ist noch schwierig bzw. teilweise unmöglich. [...]

  50. Joel says:

    Once again, thanks so much for this!

  51. Mexico501 » Blog Archive » Compilation of Web 2.0 Office Applications for School says:

    [...] Page Summary: Sorry for the lack of posts and updates the last week or two. You can perform formatting options, create tables, add a header/footer, and spell check as you type just like your average desktop word processor. Can these web-based word processors handle it?Time to put web-based word processors to the test. Will we be using web-based products to work on these kind of papers.read more | digg story [...]

  52. Vicki Davis says:

    You are an excellent blogger and I have complimented you highly in my educational blog! You are doing a GREAT job!

    http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/2006/10/best-web-2-article-this-week-was_28.html

  53. maestroalberto » Ritorno a scuola con le applicazioni del Web 2.0 (terza parte) says:

    [...] Links diretti: Parte 1, Parte 2 e Parte 3. [...]

  54. ???? » Web 2.0 ????? says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 [Part 1][Part 2][Part 3] [...]

  55. ????????? » Web 2.0 ????? says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 [Part 1][Part 2][Part 3] [...]

  56. Benefit from Web 2.0 services in School at Not So Relevant says:

    [...] In part one of the series Brian introduces readers to tools like organisers, gradebooks, todo lists but also to tools for mathematical education and media sharing. Part two deals with office applications like word processors, spreadsheets and calendars. Practical information on how blogging, wikis and podcasts can be used in an educational environment are dealt with in part three. [...]

  57. blogdriverswaltz.com » Blog Archive » links for 2006-11-01 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 Productivity tools on the web. (tags: web2.0 tools productivity) [...]

  58. mjb says:

    I also use AirSet because it can sync calendars and contacts between Outlook at home and Outlook at work.

  59. going native « zerotwohero says:

    [...] We’re living through the most exciting Internet boom since, well, the bubble, and I haven’t heard the term Web 2.0 in class once. I don’t care if its a cliché, it should have been addressed at the very least. What else is blogging, Myspace, wikis, Friendster, IM-ing but Web 2.0? Why aren’t we using the surfeit of web-based, socially-networked apps – which our students already use – to teach them? Why not folksonomies like del.icio.us, flickr and RSS, off-the-shelf tools our students can continue to use outside of school? [...]

  60. Global Trickster - » links for 2006-11-07 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 thesis research (tags: thesis web2.0) [...]

  61. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 « Apex Consulting says:

    [...] This is part two of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0? series. In this article, I will cover web-based alternatives to desktop office applications including: word processing, presentations, diagrams, spreadsheets, and more. If you are new to the series and want to learn more about educations tools, I recommend reading Part 1 of the series. If you enjoy Part 1 and Part 2, I hope you will stick around for Part 3 where I will cover real cases of Web 2.0 used in classrooms around the world. [...]

  62. Apex Consulting Blog » Blog Archive » Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 says:

    [...] This is part two of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0? series. In this article, I will cover web-based alternatives to desktop office applications including: word processing, presentations, diagrams, spreadsheets, and more. If you are new to the series and want to learn more about educations tools, I recommend reading Part 1 of the series. If you enjoy Part 1 and Part 2, I hope you will stick around for Part 3 where I will cover real cases of Web 2.0 used in classrooms around the world. [...]

  63. Pamela Fox says:

    Fantastic series.
    We’re already using Google D&S for our video game classes here, for weekly task lists and progress tracking. Granted, MLA formatting is not important to us, but honestly, I think teachers should be more concerned about content than very stingy formatting.
    The sharing & collaboration is key. I imagine it can be very useful for peer review scenarios as well.

  64. George Peterson says:

    Here’s a new one for you: http://www.openeffort.com

  65. Solution Watch « SaaS-a-fras says:

    [...] I found this blog today. This article has a summary of some online applications and has a feature comparison between Zoho, Thinkfree and a couple others. The article is targeted to education but has insights for small businesses too. [...]

  66. Jonathan Crow says:

    Thanks for taking a look at ThinkFree and the in depth comparison.

    You are correct in that ThinkFree doesn’t offer real-time collaboration at this time. We looked at some of the possiblities and decided that currently real-time collaboration creates scenarios where documents are changed without a clear indication of who changed what. And often documents get so marked up that it becomes confusing.

    Until we are able to solve these problems in a simplistic manner we think that users will appreciate knowing who made what changes when, and be able to roll back those changes if needed.

    We are also developing Quick Edit modes (written in AJAX, as opposed to our Power Edit modes written in Java). Over the long run, editing documents using Java can be much faster than AJAX applications. But, for when you need to make those simple changes, we offer Quick Edit.

    Oh yeah, and did you know we offer integration with del.icio.us, so that you can import all of your bookmarked references into a Write document?

    Thanks,
    Jonathan

  67. ?????? » ?????Web2.0???????? says:

    [...] ?????Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2?????Brian Benzinger???Sicilia Yuan , Danny Yu???Danny Yu [...]

  68. Lisa says:

    Instead of buying one program from each category, why not look at GemX’s do-Organizer (www.gemx.com). It integrates each of these programs into one, and every module is interconnected with the others. It’s one of those little-known jewels out there that once you start using you wonder how you did without.

  69. Nico says:

    Hi,

    we have just launched (today) a digg like site for academic/ educational resources.

    http://www.edumio.com

    I hope that you will post some of your academic or educational news there!

    Thanks!
    Nico Baird

  70. » Menage de liens - [ouvre.com] Mes tendances digitales says:

    [...] Remote Buddy : un logiciel qui démultiplie toutes les possibilités d’une télécommande sur votre Mac, dingue. je vais acheter, j’ai adoré la vidéo. Tiens, à propos saviez vous qu’une télécommande Apple peut piloter plusieurs Mac, il n’y a pas de distinction ou d’appariemenent. Désagréable ou utile, à vous de choisir. Les notes de Steve Jobs pour les demos (c’est écrit gros…) et les iphones de secours au cas où ça plante. Meebo : un site, pour utiliser les principaux services de messageries instantanées (aim-ichat, yahoo, msn, google), sans rien installer : très pratique. Donner envie de cliquer ? une leçon sur google video. Une solution de création de jeux video sur Mac en 3D : Unity (je ne connaissais pas). Transformer le Rss en Pdf, ok mais on ne peut pas trier/sélectionner (et quelques problèmes d’encodage). Le wifi gratuit ça rapporte. J’en étais sûr. Il faut que j’aille voir ces chemises, si possible en bleu ciel. Copies doubles : perles de copies d’école, excellent. des artistEs (girls@work) Zimbra collaboration suite, pas essayé, ça a l’air pro. Faire imprimer son blog (j’avais eu l’idée de ce service et avais trouvé blog printshop comme nom). Quelques applis web 2.0 (Firefox obligatoire) Projet de VideoConference via VLC xfruits (système d’information avec le rss comme architecture) J’aime bien la css de Jumsoft et leurs icones sont superbes. Tiens 2 softs qu’il faut que j’essaye Money et Relationship. Très étonnant Orb (accès à distance à vos médias) mais que pour windows… WiiRemote sur Mac et ce que ça donne avec MacSaber Les pommes et les oranges, avec une analyse typographique. Transformer son mac en réveil matin ? [...]

  71. Words of “e” » w.e.b. applications means more fun (maybe) says:

    [...] There are many many more of these web apps.  Solution Watch listed at least over 25 of them, all of them of different and suited for various ways of working.  I definitely recommend reading their article which lists practically all of the major web applications out there. [...]

  72. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1 says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1 Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 [...]

  73. Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 3 says:

    [...] Finally, Part 3 of the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0” series is here. During the last few weeks I have researched possible scenarios and real case studies of Web 2.0 in education in hopes to show others where we are with today’s education and where it could be. The article covers: educational blogging, photo sharing, educational podcasting, wikis, video sharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and more. Also, if you are new to the series, don’t forget about Part 1 and Part 2! [...]

  74. EduPodcast » Blog Archive » Cosa può fare la scuola con il web 2.0? mille cose più Twitter says:

    [...] Solution Watch ha pubblicato due puntate dedicate proprio alle possibili o potenziali applicazioni didattiche del Web 2.0: Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1 e Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2: tante risorse da esplorare. [...]

  75. Iris says:

    I found a new site, http://www.myschoolog.com/.
    I haven’t tried it yet but it seems to similar to myNoteIT.

  76. Serbesst Blog » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 dan E?itime Destek says:

    [...] ikinci makalede ise biraz daha geni?letmi? konuyu ve ofis yaz?l?mlar?n?n online alternafitlerini s?ralam??: kelime i?lemciler, sunum programlar?, diyagramlar, “spreadsheet”ler, takvimler… Bir de sonunda kelime i?lemcileri kar??la?t?rm??. [...]

  77. Web 2.0 Tools & You : Off the Shelf says:

    [...] Part 2 of this series expands on the Web 2.0 tools,  with categories including word processing, presentations, diagrams and mind mapping, spreadsheets, and calendars. [...]

  78. Technikwürze » Technikwürze 42 - Wie sozial ist das Netz wirklich? says:

    [...] Eine Liste nützlicher Webtools für Schule oder Studium, die aber auch Lehrern und Administratoren in ihrer Arbeit unterstützen hat Brian Benzinger auf solutionwatch.com erstellt. In den beiden bisher veröffentlichten Artikeln Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 1 und Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 nennt er zum einen Tools, die ein Studium oder die tägliche Arbeit erleichtern können, und befasst sich zweitens mit webbasierten Anwendungen, die Desktop-Programme ergänzen oder ersetzen können. In einem dritten Teil will er sich mit realen Beispielen für die Verwendung von Web2.0 im Unterricht beschäftigen. [...]

  79. MUST READ: Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 - Part 1 « jobboardgawker says:

    [...] here [...]

  80. ?????Web2.0???????? | ?????? says:

    [...] ?????Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 ?????Brian Benzinger ???Sicilia Yuan , Danny Yu ???Danny Yu [...]

  81. Technotes - Word Processing says:

    [...] [...]

  82. zymee.com says:

    Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2…

    In this article, I will cover web-based alternatives to desktop office applications including: word processing, presentations, diagrams, spreadsheets, and more….

  83. » Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 The Village Green says:

    [...] Part Two covers office applications – http://www.solutionwatch.com/515/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-2/ [...]

  84. Back to School: Writing Skills Every Student Needs > thepinkc says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0: Part 2 – from Solution Watch; this article features great information on Diagrams and Mindmapping – good ways to sketch out your ideas [...]

  85. BACK TO SCHOOL WITH THE CLASS OF WEB 2.0 « So what is Networked Learning? says:

  86. The Brain Experiment » Blog Archive » Web 2.0 says:

    [...] Web 2.0 is an expansion of the original applications of Web 1.0 which is most commonly referred to as read only web. Read only web 1.0 allows users to explore the network for information seeking. Web 2.0 is a new set of tools that allows users to collaborate ideas through new mediums of expression. These mediums of web 2.0 expressions technology allow non-web designers to create, remix, and mash together their own content online. Web 2.0 content creation tools occurs through the design of multi-user interfaces such as wiki’s, podcasting, vodcasting, and blogs. (Read Article E-Learning 2.0 How Web Technologies are Shaping Education) also read (Back to School with Web 2.0) [...]

  87. Web 2.0 Essay (ED 2203) « Robsession’s Weblog says:

    [...] Benzinger, B, (2006). Back to School With Web 2.0: Part 2, http://www.solutionwatch.com/515/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-2/ [...]

  88. The Digital Sandbox » Web 2.0 says:

    [...] Web 2.0 is an expansion of the original applications of Web 1.0 which is most commonly referred to as read only web. Read only web 1.0 allows users to explore the network for information seeking. Web 2.0 is a new set of tools that allows users to collaborate ideas through new mediums of expression. These mediums of web 2.0 expressions technology allow non-web designers to create, remix, and mash together their own content online. Web 2.0 content creation tools occurs through the design of multi-user interfaces such as wiki’s, podcasting, vodcasting, and blogs. (Read Article E-Learning 2.0 How Web Technologies are Shaping Education) also read (Back to School with Web 2.0)  [...]

  89. Beth says:

    Does anyone know of a site that allows college and high school students to join and post pictures/videos specifically for group projects? Students could collaborate on different messages or something like that.

  90. analplo says:

    dywo vbd mnqey [url=http://www.promagic.net/cp/up/index.html]play texas hold’em[/url] keay roq sfkpy

  91. Propiedad Privada » Blog Archive » De link varia says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 partes Uno, Dos y Tres es una cuidada recopilación de SolutionWatch de recursos útiles en Internet para e-Learning. [...]

  92. College ‘07 | HackCollege says:

    [...] Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 (Part 2) [...]

  93. regles jeu poker says:

    regles du poker texas…

  94. Kazelosl says:

    Hi webmaster!